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Frequently Asked Questions

Passive Fire Protection within the UK

In the year ending December 2018, there was over 175,000 reported fires within the UK – a two per cent increase compared with the previous year. Despite efforts to ensure that minimal damage is caused by fires around the UK, every year thousands of people are still affected.

As experts in passive fire protection within the construction industry, Nullifire’s mission is to raise the awareness of the importance of passive fire protection, to ensure the safety of properties and people within the UK. Take a look at our Frequently Asked Questions below to find out more. Should you have any other questions please don't hesitate to get in touch with our expert team.

What is Passive Fire Protection?

What is Passive Fire Protection?

Passive Fire Protection (PFP) is a vital component of any fire strategy. It is built into the structure of a building to safeguard people’s lives and limit the financial impact of damage to buildings and their contents.

Find out more about Passive Fire Protection

What Fire Regulations are in Place Within the UK?

What Fire Regulations are in Place Within the UK?

Fire regulations within the UK, are continuously being updated and improved to ensure the maximum protection for building structures and people.

Stay up to date with UK fire regulations

What is the Difference Between Passive Fire Protection and Active Fire Protection?

What is the Difference Between Passive Fire Protection and Active Fire Protection?

Fire protection within a building requires two types of protection: Active Fire Protection and Passive Fire Protection. Active Fire Protection relates to the detection and extinction of a fire whilst Passive Fire Protection relates to the containment of a fire.

Explore Active Fire Protection and Passive Fire Protection

What is the Role of Compartmentalisation Within a Building Facing a Fire, and How is it Done?

What is the Role of Compartmentalisation Within a Building Facing a Fire, and How is it Done?

One of the fundamentals of passive fire protection is the compartmentalisation of buildings. To limit the spread of fire and smoke within a building we must compartmentalise: divide the space into several smaller sections in order to confine the fire in the only space it was declared, during the time necessary for evacuation.

Find out more about Compartmentalisation

Can You Give Some Examples of Effective Compartmentalisation in a Situation?

Can You Give Some Examples of Effective Compartmentalisation in a Situation?

To understand the need and the issue of subdivision, it should be noted that 57% of people who died in a fire were not in a room when the fire broke out. Let’s take the a look at some examples to explain the need of effective compartmentalisation.

Explore some examples of compartmentalisation